The new method used in the treatment of pancreatic cancer in the USA, Germany and the Far East has started to be performed at the Near East University Hospital.

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Added On: 25 August 2021, Wednesday, 13:13
Last Edited On: 26 August 2021, Thursday, 08:12

The new method used in the treatment of pancreatic cancer in the USA, Germany and the Far East has started to be performed at the Near East University Hospital.
Pancreatic cancer is defined as one of the deadliest types of all cancers. 90% of patients diagnosed because of late symptoms may have limited treatment options in the fight against the disease. Near East University Hospital Nuclear Medicine Department Head Prof. Dr. Nuri Arslan says that targeted radionuclide therapies, which create hope for pancreatic cancer patients who have exhausted treatment options such as chemotherapy, radiotherapy, and immunotherapy used in cancer treatment, have started to be performed simultaneously in the USA, Germany, Far East countries and at the Near East University Hospital.

Pancreatic cancer, which is quite deadly compared to other cancer types, is considered one of the most important health problems today. This type of cancer can often be diagnosed at the stage where the tumor tissue has grown out of the pancreas. For this reason, only 10 percent of pancreatic cancer patients have a chance of surgery, and 7 percent have a 5-year life expectancy.

In the few countries of the world that have made significant investments in cancer research centers in the recent period, an innovative treatment is carried out for pancreatic cancer patients whose treatment options are very limited and who cannot respond to these treatments. Apart from chemotherapy, radiotherapy, and immunotherapy, these innovative treatments are giving hope to patients recently.

Prof. Dr. Nuri Arslan says that this treatment model, which includes the application of targeted radioactive material, has recently started to be carried out at the Near East University Hospital.

It is carried out as a 20-30 minute injection under local anesthesia.
Prof. Dr. Nuri Arslan said the following about the treatment model, which was started to be performed at the Near East University Hospital in the TRNC for the first time in this region: “Simultaneously along with the clinical studies carried out in some countries in the East, we started to perform this treatment option on our eligible patients at the Near East University Hospital. We perform personalized radionuclide treatments with radiolabeled peptides to our patients who have exhausted other treatment options and whose clinical and laboratory results are convenient. After the intravenous injection, which lasts for 20-30 minutes, the administered radioactive drug is retained in the primary tumor and other metastasis areas in the pancreas, and local radiotherapy is applied to these areas within the body. Depending on the physical properties of the radioactive material used, the patient is either sent home immediately after the application or stays under control in the hospital for 1 night.”

It reduces the patient’s pain complaints and prolongs the life span
It is expected that the treatment response, which aims to prolong the life span by reducing the patient’s pain complaints, will be received in a period of 1-2 months. No significant side effects related to treatment are observed. Prof. Dr. Nuri Arslan commented as follows; “We monitor the blood values and kidney functions of our patients before and after the treatment. In a small group of patients, we may encounter temporary complaints such as dry mouth, nausea, vomiting, and headache. We can prevent these with symptomatic treatments.”

The first application was made at the Near East University Hospital
Prof. Dr. Nuri Arslan stated that this new treatment method was applied to a 68-year-old patient with pancreatic cancer and liver metastasis at the Near East University Hospital. He also said that targeted radionuclide therapy is planned for another patient with the same condition, who did not show sufficient response towards chemotherapy and immunotherapy options.

Stating that this method can only be applied in pancreatic cancers for now, Prof. Dr. Nuri Arslan pointed out that with the development of the treatment method in the future, it will become applicable to colon, lung and breast cancer patients who have exhausted other treatment options.

Prof. Dr. Nuri Arslan: “Our goal is to share our success in treatment with the countries of the world.”
“We hope to achieve successful treatment results in the near future.” saying Prof. Dr. Nuri Arslan, pointed out that as the Near East University Hospital Nuclear Medicine Department, their goal is primarily to be a beacon of hope for cancer patients and to share the successful results of radionuclide treatments with colleagues in other countries dealing with cancer treatment.