Courses

FIRST YEAR

Fall Semester

CODE COURSE NAME C ECTS
ENG 101 English  I 3 4
SOC 100 Sociology 3 6
POL 101 Political Science I 3 6
HIST 103 History of Civilazations 3 6
ECON101 Principles of Econ.I 3 6
ATA 101 Atatürk İlkeleri I 0 2
TOTAL Semester CREDITS/ECTS 15 30

Spring Semester

CODE COURSE NAME C ECTS
ENG 102 English  II 3 4
POL 102 Political Science II 3 6
IR 111 History of Political Thought 3 6
LAW 106 Introduction to Law 3 6
ECON102 Principles of Econ.II 3 6
ATA 102 Atatürk İlkeleri II 0 2
TOTAL Semester CREDITS/ECTS 15 30

SECOND YEAR

Fall Semester

CODE COURSE NAME C ECTS
ENG 205 English for IR 3 6
IR 203 Diplomatic History 3 6
IR 205 Constitutional Law 3 6
IR 210 Modern Political Thought 3 6
IR 207 Introduction to IR I 3 6
TOTAL Semester CREDITS/ECTS 15 30

Spring Semester

CODE COURSE NAME C ECTS
ENG 206 Writing Academic English 3 6
IR 208 Introduction to IR II 3 6
HIST 205 World History of the 20th Century 3 6
HIST206 Modern Turkish Politics 3 6
IR 202 Research Methods 3 6
TOTAL Semester CREDITS/ECTS 15 30

THIRD YEAR

Fall Semester

CODE COURSE NAME C ECTS
IR 307 Intro. to International Law I 3 6
IR 311 Turkish Foreign Policy I 3 6
IR 313 Inter. Politics & Security 3 6
IR 316 Theories of IR 3 6
HIST 308 Ottoman Econ.,Social&Pol.Struct. I 3 6
TOTAL Semester CREDITS/ECTS 15 30

Spring Semester

CODE COURSE NAME C ECTS
IR 312  Inter. Institutions& Organisations 3 6
IR 315 Turkish Foreign Policy I 3 6
IR 314 Inter. Political Economics 3 6
POL 312 Comparative Pol. Systems 3 6
HIST 309 Ottoman Econ.,Social&Pol.Struct. II 3 6
TOTAL Semester CREDITS/ECTS 15 30

FOURTH YEAR

Fall Semester

CODE COURSE NAME C ECTS
IR 401 Analysis of Inter. Reletions I 3 6
IR 400 The Cyprus Issue 3 6
Elective 3 6
Elective 3 6
Elective 3 6
TOTAL Semester CREDITS/ECTS 15 30

Spring Semester

CODE COURSE NAME C ECTS
IR 402 Analysis of Inter. Reletions II 3 6
Elective 3 6
Elective 3 6
Elective 3 6
Elective 3 6
TOTAL Semester CREDITS/ECTS 15 30

TOTAL CREDITS 120 / TOTAL ECTS 240

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

YEAR 1
History of Civilization (course type: required; course code: HIST 103)

Course objective: The aim of this course is to sketch an outline of the development of civilizations in the course of history.
Course content: The course covers the main developments of the mankind from the coming of human 2.5 million years ago to the present time. The main focus is on the big turning points of the cultural as the Neolithic Revolution (10.000 years ago), the rise of the civilization (5.500 years ago), the Renaissance (1350-1520) and the coming of Modernity.

Principles of Economics I (course type: required; course code: ECON 101)
Course objective: The aim of this course is to provide the basic concepts of economics and mainly elementary micro-economics.
Course content: Topics covered are: The Economic Problem, Supply and Demand, Elasticity, Marginal Analysis of Consumers and Firms Behaviour, the Theory of Profit Maximization, Analysis of Markets, Pricing in Competitive and Non-Competitive Markets.

English I (course type: required; course code: ENG 101)
Course objective: This course aims at enabling students to understand their lessons and to express themselves in English
Course content: The course focuses mainly on grammar and developing of all language skills.

Political Science I (course type: required; course code: POL 101)
Course objective: Political Science I is designed to be an introductory course in which the logic of political science and the methods of political analysis are examined.
Course content: The course deals rather with central concepts and ideas of politics of which subject is the broad and complex. It includes the definition problematic of politics, fields of political science, the relationship between political science and other disciplines, political socialization, and modern political ideologies such as liberalism, socialism, conservatism, anarchism, nationalism, fascism, feminism and ecologism.

Sociology (course type: required; course code: SOC 100)
Course objective: The aim of this course is to give a general overview of sociology including history and methodology.
Course content: The course covers explanation of the main schools in sociology, mainly Durkheim, Weber and Marx. The course provides the overview of group, stratification, institutions and structure in general.

English II (course type: required; course code: ENG 102)
Course objective: This course aims to take students to intermediate advanced level of English.
Course content: The course concentrates rather on developing reading skills.

Political Science II (course type: required; course code: POL 102)
Course objective: The aim of this course is to provide institutional and structural aspects of politics.
Course content: This course focuses mainly on such topics as the State, Institutions of Government, Elections and Electoral Systems, Political Parties, Interest Groups, Democratic and Nondemocratic Forms of Government, Constitutional and Non-constitutional Regimes, Presidential and Parliamentary Systems, Bureaucracy and Administration,

Principles of Economics II  (course type: required; course code: ECON 102)
Course objective: The aim of this course is to offer the basic fundamentals of elementary Macroeconomics.
Course content: This course includes such topics as Determination of National Income, the Role of Government, the Banking System, Problems of Inflation, Unemployment and Growth.

Introduction to Law (course type: required; course code: LAW 106)
Course objective: This course aims to offer a basic introduction to the study of law.
Course content: This course covers the Nature of Law, Legal Systems, The Development of Law, The Structure and Work of the Courts, The Concepts of Legal Personality and Capacity and an Outline of the European Union, its Laws and Institutions, Company Law and Tort.

History of Political Thought (course type: required; course code: IR 111)
Course objective: The aim of this course is to offer a descriptive and analytical examination of political ideas and theories in the course of history.
Course content:  This course includes a collection of major political thinkers and their ideas from ancient times to early modern times. It gives due attention to such thinkers as Plato, Aristotle, Polybius, Cicero, John of Salisbury, Saint Augustine, Machiavelli, Hobbes, Locke, and etc.

Principles of Atatürk I and II (course type: required for Turkish speakers;   course code: ATA 101/102)
Course objective: This course is designed exclusively for Turkish national and Turkish Cypriot students. The aim is to provide the principles of Atatürk analytically and historically in both semesters.
Course content: This course covers the period of the process of Turkish independence war and the period of the establishment of Turkish national state, and modernization process.

YEAR 2

Modern Political Thought (course type: required; course code: IR210)
Course objective: This course aims to offer an outline of western political thought from Renaissance to modernity to appreciate the value of critical thinking in international relations.
Course content: The content of this course comprises the international theories of the great thinkers ranging from the period of early modern times to modern times, particularly Hobbes, Locke, Bodin, Montesquieu, Rousseau, J.S. Mill, Hegel and Marx.

Communication Skills for IR  (course type: required; course code: IR 215)
Course objective: The aim of the course is to provide techniques for dealing with academic prose.
Course content: The emphasis is on reading skills and analysis of texts.  Moreover, paraphrasing and summarizing are practiced.

Constitutional Law (course type: required; course code:  IR 205)
Course objective: The aim of this course is to provide an introduction to the main aspects of constitutional law.
Course content: This course mainly covers the Nature of Constitution, Classification of Constitutions, The Doctrine of the Separation of Power, The Rule of Law, Parliamentary, Supremacy and Constitutional Connections. There is also an examination of the freedom to Experience, Association, Persons and Property. Natural Justice, Delegated Legislation, Judicial Review of the Administration and Judicial Remedies and Administrative Law are also covered.

Diplomatic History (course type: required; course code: IR 203)
Course objective: The objective of the course is to provide the student with necessary background of the diplomatic practice since the medieval Age till the Second World War.
Course content: In this course, special attention is paid to the development of nation state in Europe and the emergence of diplomatic concepts and tools as expedient ways for conducting international relations.

Introduction to International Relations I (course type: required; course code: IR 207)
Course objective: The aim of this course is to introduce key conceptual issues in international relations and to analyze contemporary global problems
Course content: The course includes such topics as security, international organizations, resources, peace and war.

Writing Skills for IR (course type: required; course code: IR 216)     
Course objective: The aim of this course is to develop writing skills.
Course content: The structure of an academic essay and different types of essays (cause and effect, argumentation, comparison and contrast) are discussed. Students write two essays and receive feedback on them. 

Introduction to International Relations II (course type: required; course code: IR 208)
Course objective: The aim of this course is to introduce key conceptual issues in international relations. It analyses contemporary global problems.
Course content: This course covers security, international organizations, resources, peace and war. The main aim of the course is to encourage students for critical thinking and analysis of the world events.

World History of the 20th Century (course type: required; course code: HIST 205)
Course objective: This course aims to deals with political history of the twentieth century, and to focus on the main political events of the last hundred years.
Course content: The course thematically covers the First and the Second World War, the Cold War and the main political transformations, the coming of the mass culture, the rapid change of the word, globalisation and global problems.  

Modern Turkish Politics (course type: required; course code: HIST 206)
Course objective: This course analyzes Turkish politics from a historical perspective. It is focusing on the foundation of Turkish Republic by giving particular emphasis on Kemalist ideas. It also examines political developments in Turkey since Atatürk’s death, evaluates the position of Turkey during the Second World War, rule of Democratic Party 1950-60, and the military takeover of 1960 and 1980 as well as the 1971 ultimatum and restoration of democracy.
Course content: The course deals with the Peace Treaty of Lausanne, the Emergence of One-Party State, the Kemalist One-Party State, reform Policies and Foreign Relations, the Transition to Democracy 1945-50, the rule of Democratic Party 1950-60, foreign relations during Democratic Party rule, the 1960 coup, the 1960-70 Era, the military Ultimatum of 1971, the 1980 coup and Turkey since 1980.

Research Methods (course type: required; course code: IR 202)
Course objective: Its main aim is to give the students how to work on a research, how to write an essay. For a university student writing essays or making research are a must, but at the same time for most of the students a difficult challenge. This course is aimed at making this challenge easier and explains the importance of the methodology of such work and practice and experience of doing research.
Course content: The course deals with research processes such as how to begin a research, to choose a topic, to find the data and analyze them, to create a working plan and to write it in an appropriate way.

                         

YEAR 3

Introduction to International Law I (course type: required; course code: IR 307)
Course objective: This course intends to provide an understanding of the importance of international law for the chain of events surrounding the two world wars as well as an understanding on how international law shapes policies and the world order.
Course content: The course introduces the concept of international law, the position of international law in the development of states and the world order, legal theories of international law, international relations theories and international law, position of international organisations in international law, the concept of state responsibility, international criminal law, the position of individuals in international law, international human rights on the Cyprus Problem, international law and Nuclear Power.

Turkish Foreign Policy (course type: required; course code: IR 311)
Course objective: This course focuses on Turkish Foreign Policy from the Time of Liberation (1919-1923) to 1945. After it demonstrates the method and the approach of the foreign policy analysis, this course sets out a framework for analysis of Turkey’s relations with her neighbours as well as with big/hegemonic powers. Also, the impact of regional developments and conflicts on Turkey’s foreign policy are discussed.
Course content: The course includes topics such as: Turkish Foreign Policy in Theory and Practice, Turkish Foreign Policy between 1919 and 1923: The Time of Liberation, Turkish Foreign Policy between 1923 and 1939: Relative Autonomy, Turkish Foreign Policy between 1939 and 1945: Relative Autonomy II: 1939-1945.

International Politics & Security (course type: required; course code: IR 313)
Course objective: In this course, the current structure of the world politics is discussed with a focus on historical and theoretical debates about international politics, nation state, national interest, national security and foreign policy concepts comparatively with alternative concepts: trans-nationalism, international security and economic cooperation.
Course content: The course includes topics ranging from the evolution of world politics, levels of analysis and foreign policy, nationalism, globalization and trans-nationalism, national states, national power and diplomacy, international law and international organization, interstate conflict, asymmetric conflict, trade money, development and human rights.

Theories of IR (course type: required; course code: IR 316)
Course objective: The course aims at providing an overview of how International Relations as a discipline discusses and understands the international system.
Course content: In the first part of the course, students are given a brief historical account of theoretical development within International Relations to develop an understanding of the nature of social science theory from a non-positivist understanding. In the Second part, six theoretical approaches of IR are discussed. In the Third part original sources of some of the previously discussed theories are analyzed.

Ottoman Economical, Social and Political Structure I (course type: required; course code: HIST 308)
Course objective: This course aims to introduce the social and economic history of     the Ottoman region, from the origins of the Empire. First part of the course is covering the period 1300-1600. It examines developments in population, trade, transport, manufacturing, land tenure and the economy.
Course content: The course covers the Ottoman State: economy and society: 1300–1600; the economic mind and state revenues; state, land and peasant; land possession; trade; imperial economy; crisis and change 1590–1699; and the principal political events.

International Organisations (course type: required; course code: IR 312)
Course objective: With the completion of this course, students will have the knowledge of working procedures of the international organizations such as United Nations and will comprehend the roles of international organizations on integration processes in the world.
Course content: This course covers definitions and characteristics of international organizations; historical background of international organizations; membership, aim and structure as criterions for classification of international organizations; United Nations Organization and its organs-functions; mainstream approaches (realists-liberals) and critical approaches (Marxists-feminists-constructivists); regional security and international organizations (NATO,CIS,CSTO). The course further addresses issues like development; trade; environment; social and humanitarian issues, and global governance.

Turkish Foreign Policy II (course type: required; course code: IR 315)
Course objective: This is a continuation of IR 311 course broadening the systematic enquiry on Turkish Foreign Policy with special emphasis on Cold War and post Cold War systemic changes and their impact on Turkish Foreign Policy. The challenges of adapting to global systemic transformation, globalization, rising regional conflicts will be looked at together with efforts to deal with old issues in the new environments.
Course content: This course covers the topics from Turkish Foreign Policy Between 1945 and 1960: Turkey in the Orbit of Western Block, Turkish Foreign Policy Between 1960 and 1980: Relative Autonomy 3, Turkish Foreign Policy Between 1980-2002: Turkey in the Orbit of the Western Block and Globalization and Turkish Foreign Policy After 2002: Justice and Development Party Period.

International Political Economy (course type: required; course code: IR 314)
Course objective: This course deals with many different aspects of the International Political Economy. The subject of IPE is concerned with the interconnectedness of various areas such as economics, politics, history, sociology, etc.
Course content: In the first part of this course, the fundamental paradigms of IPE is introduced by looking at the three different theoretical perspectives: mercantilism, liberalism, and structuralism. In the Second part of the course, structural connections of IPE, leading to sections that explore international trade, international finance, international institutions and global problems are analyzed.

Comparative Politics (course type: required; course code: POL 312)
Course objective: This course intends to examine different political systems from a structural-functional perspective. It provides a conceptual and theoretical framework for comparing the processes and institutions of different political systems.
Course content: This course covers issues in comparative politics; it compares political systems; elaborates on the state in a global context; democratic and authoritarian states; authoritarian rule; democracy; conditions of democracy; political participation; patterns of participation; and highlights cases such as United States, France; Russia, Iran, China; India, Nigeria And Brazil in a comparative perspective. 

Ottoman Economical, Social and Political Structure II (course type: required; course code: HIST 309)
Course objective: This course aims to introduce the political, social and economic history of the Ottoman Empire. Second part of the course is covering the period from 1700 to 1914. It examines developments in population, trade, transport, manufacturing, land and the economy. It also covers the age of reforms and provides and overview of the 19th century.
Course content: This course covers the Ottoman State: economy and society: 1699-1914; the state and economy; the state, merchants, peasants and elite; land possession; trade; the age of reforms: 1812–1914; and overview of the nineteenth century in general.

YEAR 4

The Cyprus Issue (course type: required; course code: IR 400)
Course objective: This course provides necessary grounds to define and understand the meaning of ethnic conflict and relates it to Cyprus, to understand and perceive conflict as an identity-based conflict in Cyprus, and to be able to understand Turkish Cypriot perceptions, sensitivities and the use of politics as part of the Cyprus conflict.
Course content: This course commences with an introduction to ethnic conflict and identity-based conflict, with the case of Cyprus. Then it moves on with a brief history of Cyprus where the strategic importance of the island is mentioned. Mediation in Cyprus; property issue in the conflict; the issue of missing persons; refugees in the conflict; politics of memory in Cyprus; reconciliation and prospects for the future are among other issues which are highlighted throughout this course.

Analysis of International Relations I (course type: required; course code: IR 401)
Course objective: The course aims to provide students the grounds for developing the ability to understand and discuss international relations discipline by using an interdisciplinary methodology to merge the knowledge coming from sociology, economics, psychology, political science as well as diplomatic history while recognizing local, regional and international actors functioning within the international system.
Course content: The course covers theories of IR; international conflicts; the UN as a case study in settling international disputes in current IR; and intervention, sovereignty and non-intervention principle through further discussions on Middle East and European affairs. 

Analysis of International Relations II (course type: required; course code: IR 402)
Course objective: The course aims to provide students the grounds for developing the ability to understand and discuss international relations discipline by using an interdisciplinary methodology to merge the knowledge coming from sociology, economics, psychology, political science as well as diplomatic history while recognizing local, regional and international actors functioning within the international system. 
Course content: The course covers theories of IR; international conflicts; and current topics in IR. This course discusses refugee crisis via the case of Syrian Refugess. Besides that, Syria, Palestine, Egypt, and Middle East Politics are covered within the scope of current international topics.

Role of NGOs in IR (course type: elective; course code: IR 413)
Course objective: This course deals with the changes after the collapse of the Soviet Union and the fall of Berlin Wall. As the term civil society became a hot topic both in intellectual terms and political terms, this course will help students to understand the past and current role of the civil society in world politics.
Course content: The main discussion is how and in which ways does civil society influence the international politics? In the route of answering the question, this course will explain the historical meanings and the roles of the civil society as well.

Human Rights and International Relations (course type: elective; course code: IR 421)
Course objective: The subject of human rights has become, in the contemporary world, one of the most important factors in international relations. Proceeding from this fact, the historical development of human rights as well as the international human rights law to the present will be studied. Within this context, mechanisms and their functions that were developed especially within the body of the United Nations, Council of Europe, European Union and Organisation of Security and Cooperation in Europe will be dwelt upon.

Course content: This course covers human rights as a concept; the historical background of the term; the entry of human rights in the international arena after world war two and formation of the United Nations.

Balkan Politics (course type: elective; course code: IR 423)
Course objective: This course aims to examine political history of Balkans throughout the 19th and 20th centuries.
Course content: In the first part of the course, erosion of Ottoman control over the Western Provinces and the emergence of new nation-states in Serbia, Rumania, Bulgaria and Albania are analyzed. Within this context, influences of foreign powers like Russia (Pan-Slavism) and Austria-Hungary (Bosnia/Croatia) will be evaluated. The Second part of this course deals with the role of Balkans in the upcoming of the First World War, and its aftermath in the region (Dissolution of Austria-Hungary/Foundation of Yugoslavia etc.). The Third part will examine Balkans during the Second World War and in the following Cold War era. Finally, post-Cold War conflicts in Balkans, particularly in the former Federal Republic of Yugoslavia, are described.

The Middle East (course type: elective; course code: IR 426)
Course objective: This course aims to understand the importance of the political and economic issues in the region, which are very important for the world. Understanding the great power politics in the region, learning the regional organizations and business processes, understanding the position of the regional powers that affect the Middle East politics, and learning the religious elements of the region are among the main objectives of this course.
Course content: This course covers International Relations theory and the Middle East, highlights the emergence of the Middle East into the state system, the Cold War period in the Middle East and onwards. The course also addresses oil and political economy, political reforms, and the politics of identity in the Middle East.

Political Psychology (course type: elective; course code: IR 460)
Course objective: This course aims to describe and explain behavioural aspects of political behaviour, analyse political behaviour through the conceptual framework, and define the central concepts and ideas of political psychology.
Course content: This course covers approaches to political psychology;  personality and politics; study of political leaders;  voting behaviour;  role of media and tolerance;  politics of race;  ethnic conflicts and genocide;  political psychology of nationalism;  political psychology of terrorism;  political psychology of international security; and conflict resolution and reconciliation.

Minorities and Minority Rights (course type: elective; course code: IR 404)
Course objective: This course aims to reflect on the concept and definition of minorities, minority rights in international law, the regulations and applications regarding minorities and minority problems in various countries.
Course content: This course covers the concept and definition of minorities; League of Nations and the protection of minorities; United Nations and the protection of minorities; Council of Europe and the protection of minorities; and the European Union and the protection of minorities.  Other international organisations and their approaches towards protection of minorities are also discussed within the scope of this course.

Contemporary Political Theory (course type: elective; course code: POL 402)

Course objective: This course aims to describe and explain political world in a systematic way, analyses political phenomena through the conceptual framework, defines the central concepts and ideas of politics, and evaluates critically multiple aspects of politics.  

Course content: This course covers political theory, concepts and theories in politics, human nature and politics, the debate on individualism vs. collectivism, conceptions of politics, government and the state, conceptions of democracy, representations, and conceptions of public interest. The course further discusses rights, obligations, and citizenship.

Political Institutions (course type: elective; course code: POL 444)
Course objective: This course aims to describe institutional aspects of political phenomena, explains political institutions and their effects on political and governmental practices, describes and explains political institutions in a systematic way, analyses political institutions through the conceptual framework, and makes the connection between political theory and political practice. 
Course content: This course covers political institutions; neo-institutionalism; nation-state; electoral systems; branches of the state; legislative-executive relations; territorial dimensions; unitary state vs. federations; bureaucracy; courts; political parties; and interest groups.

Interest Groups and Lobbying (course type: elective; course code: POL 452)
Course objective: This course is intended to provide students with an introduction to interest groups and lobbying from a comparative perspective.
Course content: This course defines and classifies interest groups and research agenda; addresses on group mobilization; interest group strategies; interest group influence; ethics in lobbying; and interest group systems.