Courses

Also available in: Türkçe

FIRST YEAR

1st Semester

Course Code Course Name T U C
ELT 151 Contextual Grammar I 3 0 3
ELT 153 Advanced Reading and Writing I 3 0 3
ELT 155 Listening and Pronunciation I 3 0 3
ELT 157 Oral Communication Skills I 3 0 3
ELT 157 Effective communication 3 0 3
EDS 101 3 0 3
TUR 101 Turkish I: Composition 2 0 2
COM 101 Computer I 2 2 3
Total Credit 19 2 20

2nd Semester

Course Code Course Name T U C
ELT 152 Contextual Grammar II 3 0 3
ELT 154 Advanced Reading and Writing II 3 0 3
ELT 156 Listening and Pronunciation II 3 0 3
ELT 158 Oral Communication Skills I 3 0 3
ELT 160 Lexical Competence 3 0 3
TUR 102 Turkish II: Speech and Communication 2 0 2
EDS 102 3 0 3
COM 102 Computer II 2 2 3
Total Credit 22 2 23

SECOND YEAR

3rd Semester

Course Code Course Name T U C
ELT251 English Literature I 3 0 3
ELT253 Linguistics I 3 0 3
ELT 255 Approaches to ELT I 3 0 3
ELT 257 English-Turkish Translation 3 0 3
ELT 259 Oral Expression and Public Speaking 3 0 3
AIT 201 2 0 2
EDS 201 3 0 3
Total Credit 23 0 23

4th Semester

Course Code Course Name T U C
ELT 252 English Literature II 3 0 3
ELT 254 Linguistics II 3 0 3
ELT 256 Approaches to ELT II 3 0 3
ELT 258 Language Acquisition 3 0 3
ELT 260 Scientific Research Methods 2 0 2
AIT 202 2 0 2
EDS 202 2 2 3
EDS 204 2 2 3
Total Credit 20 4 22

THIRD YEAR

5th Semester

Course Code Course Name T U C
ELT 351 Teaching English to Young Learners I 2 2 3
EDS 305 2 2 3
ELT 353 Teaching Language Skills I 2 2 3
EDS 303 2 0 2
ELT 355 Literature and Language Teaching I 3 0 3
SFL 301 Second Foreign Language I 2 0 2
EDS 307 2 0 2
Total Credit 15 6 18

6th Semester

Course Code Course Name T U C
ELT 352 Teaching English to Young Learners II 2 2 3
ELT 358 Turkish-English Translation 3 0 3
ELT 354 Teaching Language Skills II 2 2 3
ELT 360 1 2 2
ELT 356 Literature and Language Teaching II 3 0 3
SFL 302 Second Foreign Language II 2 0 2
EDS 308 3 0 3
Total Credit 16 6 19

FOURTH YEAR

7th Semester

Course Code Course Name T U C
ELT 451 Language Teaching Materials Adaptation and Development * 3 0 3
SFL401 Second Foreign Language III 2 0 2
Elective I 471 473 475 477 479 481 2 0 2
ELT 453 2 2 3
EDS 405 2 0 2
EDS 401 1 4 3
EDS 403 3 0 3
Total Credit 15 6 18

8th Semester

Course Code Course Name T U C
ELT 452 English Language Testing and Evaluation 3 0 3
Elective II 472 474 476 478 2 0 2
Elective III 480 482 484 486 488 2 0 2
EDS 406 2 6 5
EDS 402 2 0 2
EDS 404 2 0 2
Total Credit 13 6 16
TOTAL 143 32 159

Course Descriptions

I.Semester

ELT 151: Contextual Grammar I (3-0-3)
This course aims to promote understanding the relation between language structures and lexical items as well as raising awareness about the attribution of meaning by means of these structures. Within the framework of a context, advanced language structures are analyzed so as to establish relations between form and text type. Synthesizing these structures, students produce advanced level texts employing these structures. The course also emphasizes interactive activities such as group and pair work.TOP

ELT 153: Advanced Reading and Writing I (3-0-3)
This course presents a wide range of authentic reading materials including newspapers, journals, reviews and academic texts in order to comprehend contrasting viewpoints and to predict and identify main ideas and to decode intersentential clues. It also aims to equip students with intensive and extensive reading habits. Critical thinking skills such as synthesizing information or analyzing a problem as well as reacting on the basis of evaluation are fostered. Such sub-skills of reading are employed by the students’ in their writings. Students also analyze and produce different types of writings (e.g. expository paragraph, descriptive paragraph, narrative paragraph, etc.); build up writing skills emphasizing the organization, coherence, and cohesion and such sub-skills as summarizing, outlining, and paraphrasing at paragraph level. The use of spelling and punctuation conventions as well as non-alphabetic symbol use will be practiced as well.TOP

ELT 155: Listening and Pronunciation I (3-0-3) )
This course aims to develop students’ listening and pronunciation skills while gaining confidence in communicating in English. It employs authentic listening materials and speech samples used in different discourses in order to be analyzed as communication-oriented classroom activities. Starting from basic listening and phonetic skills such as discriminating minimal pairs and formulating phonetic transcriptions of problematic sounds focused in class, the course will focus on higher level listening skills and strategies by integration of reading and writing to the course curriculum through content-based activities. Students will be provided with the fundamentals of listening and phonetics namely vowels, consonants, stress in words, rhythm and intonation as well as the usage of phonetic alphabet for learning and production purposes. Collaborative learning through group and pair work will be encouraged.TOP

ELT 157: Oral Communication Skills I (3-0-3)
This course offers a variety of different communication-oriented speaking activities such as discussions, individual presentations and other interactive tasks providing opportunity for students to improve their oral competence by developing effective language use both in formal and informal contexts. By exploring components of communicative competence, this course aims to equip students with the necessary skills to become successful communicators as well as language teachers. Students will utilize the theoretical and practical knowledge acquired in listening and pronunciation courses in delivering brief informative, persuasive presentations. Students will develop a good command in supra-segmental features (pitch, stress and intonation) as well. Besides, students will be acquainted with the use of audiovisual aids (OHP, power point, posters) and techniques which will help them become effective speakers.TOP

ELT 152: Contextual Grammar II (3-0-3)
This course is a continuation of Contextual Grammar I. This course leads students to have a critical perspective into the advanced level structures (e.g. word classes, elements of the sentence, types of sentence, sentence fragments etc.) of different types of texts on a contextual level. Building upon analysis and synthesis, students evaluate the most problematic forms of English grammar with guidance in their function and usage using methods such as error analysis or discourse analysis. Besides presenting a descriptive review of the forms and function of advanced English grammar structure, this course encourages students to develop a critical stance toward the use of these structures in various contexts. The course also emphasizes interactive activities such as group and pair work.

ELT 154: Advanced Reading and Writing II(3-0-3)
This course is a continuation of Advanced Reading and Writing I. This course promotes higher level thinking skills. By processing a variety of different authentic reading texts, students will develop superior-level sub-skills of reading namely, making inferences and deductions, and reading between the lines. Students will relate inferences from the text to real life, and gain insights into the cultural similarities and differences. By means of the awareness gained from the texts, students will analyze, synthesize and evaluate information and therefore, in their compositions, react to readings. Students will also analyze and produce different types of essays (e.g. comparison and contrast, classification, process analysis, cause-and-effect analysis, and argumentative) that are unified, coherent and organized. In addition to the integration of reading with writing, research-based instruction will be adopted, so that students will develop basic research skills includingLibrary/internet search, and basic research report writing skills such as citing, paraphrasing and referencing.TOP

ELT 156: Listening and Pronunciation II (3-0-3)
This course is a continuation of Listening and Pronunciation I, this course will focus on basic skills and principles of listening and phonetics. A variety of different authentic listening texts and academic presentations will be utilized to develop students’ receptive listening skills. This course includes such sub-skills of listening as note-taking, predicting, extracting specific and detailed information, guessing meaning from context, and getting the gist. Throughout the course, students will be exposed to aural authentic listening materials such as interviews, movies, songs, lectures, TV shows and news broadcasts. This course also aims to equip student teachers with a strong sensitivity towards different accents of English language being spoken around the world. Collaborative learning through group and pair work will be encouraged.TOP

ELT 158: Oral Communication Skills I(3-0-3)
This course is a continuation of Oral Communication Skills I. It offers extended communicative tasks such as debates, role-plays, individual and group presentations, impromptu speeches and other interactive tasks providing opportunity for students to improve their oral competence by developing effective language use both in formal and informal contexts. Integrating different reading and listening texts into communication-oriented tasks, this course aims to develop students’ productive skills beyond their receptive skills. The course includes discussion topics, interesting facts, stimulating quotes as well as literary texts which are structurally and intellectually complex and thought-provoking thus promoting interest and motivation in communication. Common pronunciation mistakes are listed and discussed so as to raise the awareness of students as future language teachers. It also aims to develop students’ strategic competence to be utilized in repairing communication breakdowns as communication.TOP

ELT 160: Lexical Competence (3-0-3)
This course aims to raise students’ understanding of the relation between lexical items and structural forms as well as expanding their vocabulary knowledge by focusing on the components of word formation including prefixes and suffixes. Students also learn idioms, collocations, slang, euphemisms, neologisms, proverbs and phrasal verbs to help them to better explore, review, play with and enhance their spoken and written expression. Throughout the course, students will engage in interactive content-based tasks such as problem-solving activities, error analysis, and journals writing to increase their vocabulary span.

III.Semester

ELT 251: English Literature I (3-0-3)
This introductory course includes brief cultural history of British and American literature and literary works written in English, fundamental terms and techniques used while studying a literary text, introduction to the major genres and styles in literature, and introduction to the movements and periods in literature in English. Students analyze the content and style of various literary texts such as short story, poem, drama and novel representing different periods and genres of English literature. This course also focuses on developing an appreciation for literature’s contribution to our understanding of life. Students use literary tools to analyze and critically evaluate the works they have read. This course, through classroom discussions, aims to help students gain a critical perspective towards the texts. Students also analyze literary arts used in these texts, and interpret them so as to make deductions, inferences and evaluations.TOP

ELT 253: Linguistics I (3-0-3)
This course gives an introduction to the basic concepts in linguistic analysis; understanding the nature, structure, and use of language by way of awareness raising activities, error analysis of language learners’ production, case studies, and comparative analysis of native and target languages. The topics under investigation are the components of language as a system: linguistic competence and performance, branches of linguistics, types of grammar, language universals, creativity of linguistic knowledge, arbitrariness of language, sign languages, artificial languages and animal communication; brain and language:, lateralization and handedness, evolution of language, human language processing models, research on language and disorders (e.g., dichotic listening, split brain, WADA); phonetics: acoustic, auditory and articulatory phonetics, speech organs, phoneme, vowels and consonants, IPA, diphthongs, tripthongs, manner and place of articulation; phonology: sound patterns, assimilation, dissimilation, linking, consonant clusters, silent letters, suprasegmentals, stress and intonation; semantics: componential analysis, entailment, semantic relations, sense and reference, collocational meaning.TOP

ELT 255: Approaches to ELT I (3-0-3)
This course presents basic issues and processes in ELT course design. It focuses on identifying the difference among approach, method and technique and the significance of these concepts in course design. A critical overview of methods and approaches taking a historical perspective is presented: Grammar Translation Method, Direct Method, Audio-lingual Method, Silent Way, Community Language Learning, Suggestopedia, Communicative Approach, the Natural Approach. Student teachers will discover and synthesize classroom application possibilities of such methods through designing micro-teaching of activities associated with them.

ELT 257: English-Turkish Translation (3-0-3)
This course includes the fundamental theories and approaches in the science of translation. Students translate a variety of different authentic English texts into Turkish. Besides translation activities from diverse areas, students also engage in error analysis tasks in which they critically evaluate the appropriateness of the various translations of the same text and its comparison to their own translation by employing different translation skills. Various aspects of translation will be evaluated including style, word selection, the role and importance of translation in language learning and teaching and cultural aspects of translation. The practical aspect of the course will go hand in hand with readings covering theoretical grounds pertinent to current issues in the field of translation. Exposure to and translation of ELT-related materials will also be encouraged.TOP

ELT 259: Oral Expression and Public Speaking (3-0-3)
This course is an introduction to public speaking and focuses on development of practical skills for effective communication. It emphasizes fundamental stages of speech preparation and delivery including adopting and developing audio and visual aids. Throughout the course, students will deliver extended presentations as an outcome of extensive reading and research. Samples of successful presentations will be analyzed in terms of the appropriateness of content, form, and audiovisual aids. The course also aims to foster students’ oral and written language skills in job-related situations such as interviewing, socializing, telephoning, presenting information, holding meetings as well as CV and application writing.TOP

IV.Semester

ELT 252: English Literature II (3-0-3)
This course is a continuation of English Literature I. It explores a variety of literary texts from a range of eras and writers of British and American literature and literary works written in English, accordingly. Students will have the chance to practice their knowledge about key terms and concepts by analyzing literary texts in order to identify these concepts and their use in a text. The course will provide a solid foundation about the fundamental movements and periods in literature written in English. Through the use of selected literary texts from various periods, fundamental concepts, terms, techniques and literary, philosophical and scientific approaches movements in these literatures will be examined. Student teachers are expected to prepare focused writing assignments for designated topics.TOP

ELT 254: Linguistics II (3-0-3)
This course is a continuation of Linguistics I. An elaboration on further topics in linguistics is presented by way of awareness raising activities, error analysis of language learners’ production data, case studies, and comparative analysis of native and target languages. The topics under investigation are: morphology; free and bound morphemes, compounds, inflectional morphology, derivational morphology, morphemic analysis, morphological typology of languages, analysis of the internal hierarchical structure of words, morphophonological variation; syntax: word categories, phrase and clause structure, transformational-generative grammar, government and binding, minimalist program, argumant structure, theta-roles; pragmatics: deixis, implicature, conversational maxims, speech acts and politeness. sociolinguistics; dialects, register, style; discourse: criteria for textuality, types of cohesive devices, discourse connections, functions, the discourse situation, institutional discourse, and similar topics.TOP

ELT 256: Approaches to ELT II (3-0-3)
As a continuation of Approaches to ELT I, this course focuses on current issues and practices in ELT course design, selecting the appropriate approach suitable to learner needs based on current distinctions such as ESL, EFL, EIL, ESP, EAP. It outlines current foreign language teaching trends such as constructivist approach, content-based instruction, task-based instruction, problem-based teaching, multiple intelligences, whole language approach and corpus-based applications of language teaching and designing micro-teaching of activities associated with them. This course aims to raise awareness of issues of culture and classroom second/foreign language learning, of technology use in language classrooms, and of the need for developing communicative and intercultural competencies for the language learner and teacher of the globalized world and designing micro-teaching of activities associated with them.TOP

ELT 258: Language Acquisition (3-0-3)
This course presents an overview of the theories of first and second language acquisition (e.g.: behaviorism, innatism, information processing, connectionism, the interactionist position) and focuses on the developmental stages and sequences of first and target language acquisition. Case studies, comparative analysis of the use of native and target languages in corpus data (e.g.: CHILDES database), recordings and/or transcriptions of real second language classroom interaction will be employed for the analysis of first and second language acquisition; comparison of second language acquisition in children and in adults; identifying developmental sequences in first language acquisition; stages in second language morpho-syntactic development; processes in second language acquisition; learner characteristics and individual variation in ultimate attainment in second language acquisition (e.g.: role of personality, language aptitude, intelligence, age of acquisition, motivation and attitudes, learner preferences and beliefs); differences between second language acquisition and foreign language learning contexts (e.g.: natural vs. instructional settings). Lectures, group and pair work activities will be utilized.TOP

V.Semester

ELT 351: Teaching English to Young Learners I (2-2-3)
This course gives an overview of the difference between young learners (K-6) and and learners at other ages (in terms of learning of language structures, skills and sub-skills) and misconceptions about young learners. The aim of the course is to help student teachers identify learner styles (e.g.: visual, auditory, kinesthetic) and strategies (e.g.: meta cognitive, cognitive, socio affective) of young learners and developing activities (e.g.: puzzles, stories and games, simulations) and audio visual aids (e.g.: pictures, realia, cartoons, puppets, songs) for the teaching of vocabulary, language skills and structures; select and sequence teaching points and adapt and evaluate materials according to the cognitive and affective development and language level of the learners; to outline classroom management techniques necessary for teachers of young learner classrooms; to emphasize the importance of collaborative learning and interaction through group and pair work, and of ways to encouraging young learners to respect each other’s learning styles and strategies, and sharing responsibility for self and others learning.TOP

ELT 353: Teaching Language Skills I (2-2-3)
This course concentrates on building language awareness and teaching skills through a detailed study of techniques and stages of teaching listening, speaking, pronunciation and vocabulary to language learners at various ages and language proficiency levels. Student teachers will design individual and/or group micro-teaching activities focusing on the language skills above with adherence to principles of lesson planning and techniques of the specific skills for a variety proficiency levels.TOP

ELT 355: Literature and Language Teaching I* (3-0-3)
This course concentrates on the analysis of examples from British and American short stories and novels and those which are originally produced in English; and identification of the distinctive features of short stories and novels. Student teachers will explore different approaches to using literature with teenage and adult learners at all levels; examining ways in which the teaching of literature and language can be integrated in these two genres (short story and novel) and exploring theoretical and practical dimensions of this integration. This course will provide linguistic and artistic enrichment by teaching the analysis of literary texts as content and as context. Through this course, student teachers will also investigate how culture teaching is possible through short stories and drama in the following domains: comparison and contrast between objects or products that exist in the target and native culture; proverbs, idioms, formulaic expressions which embody cultural values; social structures, roles and relationships; customs/rituals/traditions; beliefs, values, taboos and superstitions; political, historic and economic background; cultural institutions; metaphorical/connotative meanings, use of humour. Moreover, the course will sensitize the students towards social issues by presenting techniques on how to enrich the literary text through prose, underlining the importance of using activities based on literary texts to create an awareness of one’s contribution to society. This course also touches upon the examination and evaluation of literary texts as motivating language material.TOP

SFL 301: Second Foreign Language I* (3-0-3)
Depending on the facilities of the department, the student teachers may have the option of learning one of the following languages as a second foreign language requirement: German, French, Spanish, Italian, Arabic, Japanese, Chinese, Russian or Greek.TOP
This course is an introduction to the basics of a second foreign language. It aims at providing student teachers with the skills required for basic communication. The aim for student teachers is to understand simple every day dialogues and basic reading texts, express themselves and ask questions in the basic spoken language. To fulfill these aims, dialogues and reading texts are utilized. Student teachers are exposed to the basic structures and vocabulary items of the target language in communicative contexts, but grammar is not the primary focus. Listening is an important component of the course and is integrated especially with speaking. Besides, some insights into the target culture and life style will be given. *This course is prerequisite for Second Foreign Language II and III.TOP

VI.Semester

ELT 352: Teaching English to Young Learners II (2-2-3)
This course is a continuation of Teaching English to Young Learners I. The intent of the course is analyzing how to design young learner course syllabuses focusing on the applicability of different syllabus types (e.g.: story-based, content-based, theme-based, task-based) and the effective ways to make use of child literature within a chosen syllabus. Analysis and discussions of video recordings of young learner classrooms with reference to classroom management, presentation of language and practice in class will be utilized. Student teachers will design a course and/or materials for a chosen syllabus type teaching activities and assessment practices for a diverse range of young learners (K-6).TOP

ELT 358: Turkish-English Translation (3-0-3)
Being the counterpart of English-Turkish Translation, this course will rely on both theoretical as well as practical grounds. Adopting a contrastive analysis method, students evaluate the effectiveness of a translation paying attention to the idiosyncrasies regarding the unique nature of Turkish and English. Various aspects of translation will be evaluated including style, word selection, the role and importance of translation in language learning and teaching and cultural aspects of translation. The practical aspect of the course will go hand in hand with readings covering theoretical grounds pertinent to current issues in the field of translation. Exposure to and translation of ELT-related materials will also be encouraged.TOP

ELT 354: Teaching Language Skills II (2-2-3)
This course is a continuation of Teaching Language Skills I. This course concentrates on building language awareness and teaching skills through a detailed study of techniques used in and stages of teaching reading, writing, and grammar to language learners at various ages and language proficiency levels. Student teachers will design individual and/or group micro teaching activities focusing on the integration of the language skills above with adherence to principles of lesson planning and techniques of the specific skills for a variety proficiency levels.TOP

ELT 356: Literature and Language Teaching II* (3-0-3)
This course is a continuation of Literature and Language Teaching I. It concentrates on the characteristics of poetry and drama as a literary genre; approaches to analyzing ways to use contemporary poetry and drama from British, American literature and those which are originally produced in English, employing activities that help students analyze literature as context and as content. The course elaborates on ways in which the teaching of literature and language can be integrated in these two genres (poetry and drama) and explores theoretical and practical dimensions of this integration. Through this course, student teachers will investigate how teaching cultural and social issues is possible through poetry and drama in the following domains: comparison and contrast between objects or products that exist in the target and native culture; proverbs, idioms, formulaic expressions which embody cultural values; social structures, roles and relationships; customs/rituals/traditions; beliefs, values, taboos and superstitions; political, historic and economic background; cultural institutions; metaphorical/connotative meanings, use of humour. This course also touches upon the examination and evaluation of literary texts as motivating language material. Application of various language based activities to literary texts through peer teaching will be utilized.TOP

SFL 302: Second Foreign Language II* (2-0-2)
This course is a continuation of beginning level of second foreign language. It aims at providing communicative tasks for student teachers to actually communicate in the target language. Student teachers will be exposed to commonly occurring grammatical patterns and vocabulary items in written texts such as newspapers, magazines and short stories. Simple writing tasks will also be integrated into the course. Both listening and speaking are important components of this course and more vocabulary items will be presented through longer dialogues and reading texts. More insights into the target culture and life style will be given through the use of authentic materials.
*This course is prerequisite for second foreign language III

VII.Semester

ELT 541Language Teaching Materials Adaptation and Development * (3-0-3)
This course focuses on acquainting student teachers with the theory and principles of ELT materials design (e.g.: selecting, adapting, developing and evaluating materials) and equipping student teachers with the basic arguments for and against the use of coursebooks in the classroom. Student teachers will be sensitized to the relation between methodology, ideology and the coursebook writer. This course emphasizes issues related to selection of language materials: suitability regarding the format, the students’ proficiency level, learnability, ease of use, cultural content, availability of communicative interaction and language use, and the use of corpus-based authentic materials set in a real-world context which allows learners to interact with each other or the teacher in meaningful ways. The following issues related to adapting or developing materials for language teaching are also taken up: adapting coursebook materials to particular learning needs and teaching contexts, and designing their own teaching materials and supplementing materials parallel to the methodology, to the level and needs of the students and to present school environment. Student teachers engage in the discussion of issues related to evaluation of materials and text books used in EFL classroom settings, are familiarized with language material and textbook evaluation criteria and ways to relate materials design to current ELT methodology.TOP

SFL 401: Second Foreign Language III (2-0-2) )
This course is a continuation of Second Foreign Language II. It aims at further developing student teachers’ reading and oral skills. Authentic texts of different genres will be studied in order to focus on more complex grammatical structures and advanced level vocabulary items. Student teachers are expected to make short oral presentations, produce role-plays, watch short extracts of movies in the target language and participate in simple discussions on a related topic in class and write letters and e-mails of greeting, complaint, response etc., diary entries and short paragraphs and essays. Further insights into the target culture and life style will be given through authentic classroom materials and research tasks.TOP

ELECTIVE I:

ELT 471 – History of English (2-0-2)
A survey of the major historical trends in the development of the English language.TOP

ELT 473 – Discourse Analysis & Language Teaching (2-0-2)
The basic aim of this course is to give students an understanding of the different approaches to discourse analysis. Topics include speech acts, speech events and components in the establishment and maintenance of discourse such as topic, turn-taking, cohesion and coherence.TOP

ELT 475 – English Culture & Civilisation (2-0-2)
English culture and civilisation from the Middle Ages to the Present. Interdisciplinary survey of the geography, literature, film, art, architecture, music and theatre in the context of English cultural history. The main aim of this course is to tap into the vast cultural, historical and social heritage of England, that is often overlooked. Students will have the opportunity to delve into the following interesting themes: What is the role of the Queen and Monarchy in England? What are the most famous and historically important historical places in England? The course will also examine the following aspects of English Culture: English Literature, the different dialects of English used in England, Social Customs and Practices, English Architecture and Religious belief. Again, teaching will place more emphasis on student participation as opposed to rigid lectures.TOP

ELT 477 – Stylistics (2-0-2)
Studies the features of situationally distinctive uses of language and tries to establish principles capable of accounting for the particular choices made by individual and social groups in their use of language. General stylistics, literary stylistics and phonostylistics are the topics considered.TOP

ELT 479 – Advanced Composition (3-0-3)
Practice in conceiving, composing and polishing essays, articles and reviews on largely controversial cultural, political, social, historical, artistic and literary subjects. The context assumed is what the British call “high journalism”. The aim of this course is to generate materials professional enough for publication.TOP

ELT 481 – Film Studies (2-0-2)
The purpose of this course is to introduce students to the fundamentals of film as an art form. The course aims to guide students to watch films more critically and widen their analytical viewing skills. Selected films are viewed and discussed in connection with their style and themes. Films which were produced as films – that is, not based on books or works of drama – constitute the material of the course. The course covers a close analysis of at least seven films by directors such as Spielberg, Tarantino, Kubrick or Lynch who have made a great impact on cinema. By the end of the course, students will be able to trace major developments in film history, discuss the concepts of film in considerable detail and identify the various elements of film style.TOP

VIII.Semester

ELT 452: English Language Testing and Evaluation (3-0-3)
This course presents an overview of basic concepts, principles and constructs of classroom-based assessment. It focuses on the identification of different types of tests and testing (e.g.: proficiency, achievement, diagnostic, and placement tests, direct vs. indirect testing, discrete point vs. integrative testing, norm referenced vs. criterion referenced testing, objective testing vs. subjective testing, communicative language testing) and various types of questions for a wide range of language assessment purposes, development and evaluation of such language tests and of other available types (e.g.: portfolio, self assessment, learner diaries). Student teachers are expected to prepare language tests for different age groups, different proficiency levels and various learner styles. Student teachers are familiarized with test preparation techniques for testing reading, writing, listening, speaking, vocabulary and grammar individually and testing language skills in an integrated manner. The course also promotes the understanding and application of basic descriptive and inferential statistical calculations and the principles underlying test design (e.g.: content, criterion related, construct, face validity; reliability, standard error of measurement and the true score; practicality). The course also covers stages of test construction, carrying out item analysis and interpretation of test scores, assessing standardized tests (e.g.: TOEFL, IELTS and exams accredited by the Council of Europe for the European Language Portfolio), teacher-prepared language tests and achieving beneficial backwash.TOP

ELECTIVE II:

ELT 472 – Sociolinguistics (2-0-2))
This course explores linguistic and cultural diversities of the United Kingdom and the United States. Topics covered include: language prestige, language change, regional and social dialect variation, bias and multilingualism, language and gender.TOP

ELT 474 – Advanced Grammar (2-0-2))
This course has a dual purpose, being suitable either for independent use as a survey of the main syntactic structures in contemporary English or as an introduction to the descriptive framework used in more comprehensive grammars. Students are also expected to be creative in using grammatical points for communicative purposes.TOP

ELT 476 – Mythology (2-0-2))
This course provides a thematic introduction to World Mythology. Myths from a wide range of cultures and civilisations are chosen to help students gain a global taste of past mythology. As well as gaining an insight into selected myths, more importantly students will see the direct link between different cultures and the way in which this influences the development of mythology.TOP

ELT 478 – Internet ile öğretim (2-0-2)
Bu dersin temel amacı yabancı dil sınıflarında kullanılabilecek internet teknolojilerini öğrencilere tanıtmak ve bunların dil öğretiminde yaygın ve etkili bir biçimde kullanılmasını sağlamaktır. Ders süresince öğrenciler bu teknolojilerin dil sınıflarında nasıl işe koşulacaklarını öğreneceklerdir. Öğrenciler bu ders sayesinde, elektronik posta, blog, wiki, prodcast, çevrimiçi referans araçlarını, teknoloji merkezli ders yazılımlarını elektronik materyalleri ve elektronik öğrenme uygulamalarını dil öğretiminde etkili bir biçimde kullanma yollarını öğreneceklerdir.TOP

ELT 478 – Teaching with the Internet (2-0-2)
This course introduces students to the internet technologies and provides a collection of offline and online activities for use in the language classroom. During the course students will study and investigate the basic elements of internet technologies and they will be guided to incorporate these into language leaning. During the course students will able to study e-mails, blogs, wikis, prodcasts, online reference tools, technology-based courseware, electronic materials, and e-learning practices.TOP

ELECTIVE III:

ELT 480 – Semantics in LT (2-0-2)
The course is introductory, with emphasis on a pragmatic aqualitative approach to semantics. In addition to traditional topics, the course attempts to analyse the semantic aspects of language from the perspective of English language teaching.

ELT 482 – Advanced Translation (2-0-2)
The theory and practice of translation; translation techniques with special reference to English and Turkish languages. To improve the students’ knowledge of English; the passages carefully chosen for specific purposes help students to equip themselves with translation skills.TOP

ELT 484 – Contrastive Analysis (2-0-2)
This course provides a comparison of Turkish and English phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics and discourse in a contrastive analaysis of two languages; the differences identified are studied as areas of potential difficulty in foreign language learning.TOP

ELT 486: Bilingualism (2-0-2)
This course is an undergraduate-level introduction to bilingualism.The primary goal is to survey a broad range of social,psychological and linguistics issues that underline much of the discussion in the extensive literature on bilingualism,with a focus on both child and adult bilinguals.Various description and definitions of bilingualism will be considered.Some other important issues that will be discussed will include individual bilingualism,aspect of bilingual competence,features of bilingual speech, societal multilingualism,language choice,language maintenance and language shift.Active participation in class discussion is both expected and encouraged.TOP

ELT 488: Critical Thinking (2-0-2)
This course scrutinizes the process of thinking critically and guides students in thinking more clearly, insightfully and effectively. Concrete examples from students’ experience and contemporary issues help students develop the abilities to solve problems, analyze issues, and make informed decisions in their academic, career and personal lives. Substantive readings, structured writing assignments and ongoing discussions help students develop language skills while fostering sophisticated thinking abilities.